2k!

I’ve just had the 2000th view of my little old blog and I’m well chuffed!
An average of over 40 views per post. Good,bad or just plain mediocre i don’t know because I’ve not not anything to compare it with!
But it makes me feel the effort put into the blog is worthwhile,so a big thank you to all those that take the time to read it.
Any comments/ideas on how i can improve it would be welcomed and possibly even acted on.
Anyway I’m off to celebrate with a cup of tea!

Don’t tell the wife…..

I used her kitchen as an impromptu photo studio!

image

image

image

One of my recent acquisitions,excuse the rubbish pictures.
1966 seagull century 4hp. Direct drive,no clutch or reverse gear but i don’t want to go backwards anyway.
Quality British engineering, noisy,smoky and dirty,but on the plus side almost infinitely repairable, most parts can be found at sensible prices and the outboards themselves are relatively cheap!
They also have have character in abundance and are quite easy to maintain/repair.
Oh and they’re cheap(or did i already mention that?)
Haven’t had this one up and running yet,not had the time to ‘play’ but I’m quite confident it’ll be a goer.
It’s not in bad condition,plenty of compression and not seized,so fingers crossed.
Should push ‘seal’ along nicely i hope. Kingfisher outboard wells are designed for a short shaft,but an email to John at ‘savingoldseagulls’ confirmed they are easily converted, basically on the model i have,all you need is a sharp hacksaw! Honest.
Couldn’t do that with a Yamaha/Mariner/Honda etc,i bet.
‘Savingoldseagulls’ is well worth a Google if you’ve got any interest in old British engineering/or are bored. Great website,very informative and a good source of parts/advice etc.

Seaman stains!

Firstly, apologies to all for the lack of activity lately. Difficulties in my personal life are mostly to blame, but are now mostly resolved so I’ll try and get the project and blog back on track.
image
The heads on ‘seal’ at time of purchase.
image
And the quality treatment of the floor.
image
The manifold the original sea toilet would have sat on.
image
The new heads floor and shelf in undercoat. An improvement?
image
And with the porta potti in place.
image

Main hatch stained
image

image

The new extra heavy duty tiller alongside the weak and feeble original!

Well,the weather didn’t play ball on my week off work,the first 3 or4 days were wall to wall drizzle,so my painting schedule was well and truly thwarted.
I did however get some jobs done.
The new heads floor is undercoated and I’ve constructed a shelf at the back of it to store spare bog rolls and toilet chemicals etc. I may yet add another shelf above it,you can never have too much storage on a boat.
I’ve finished the final shaping and sanding on the new tiller,and got the first 2 coats of stain on it. I’ll add more once it’s fitted.
The teak slats on the main hatch are now properly sealed and have also had a couple of coats of stain.
Both hatch runners are fitted/sealed and undercoated.
I’ve also fitted an external 12v socket inside one of the cockpit coaming cubby holes,a convenient sheltered place for it
So,some progress.